Archived entries for Gin

Bee’s Knees

bees knees

Combine all ingredients in a shaker. Shake, strain into a chilled glass and garnish.
Adapted from The Standard Bartender’s Guide by Patrick Gavin Duffy

  • .75 oz fresh lemon juice
  • .75 oz honey-thyme simple syrup
  • 1.5 oz gin
  • ice to fill shaker
  • lemon peel twist and thyme sprig for garnish

Watermelon-ade

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Image by Roland Bello / Gourmet

Another good one for a non-alcoholic option, or can be mixed to make a pretty good long iced cocktail.

The soft version (makes about 1 litre)
Measures & Instructions:

  • juice 1/2 a watermelon (or enough to get a about 660ml of juice)
  • 330ml  home-made lemonade mix

Mix the ingredients together & add freshly squeezed lemon juice to taste – you don’t want this too sweet, it should be refreshing.
Bottle and refrigerate. Serve over ice and top with soda.

 

The hard version
Measures & Instructions:

  • 30-60ml vodka or gin
  • watermelon-ade mix (see above)
  • splash of soda

Add watermelon-ade mix to the vodka or gin in a tall glass with plenty of ice. Stir & top with a splash of soda for a bit of fizz.

Ramos Gin Fizz

2009_12_02_gin_fizz

Known to the ‘sporting man’ as the corpse reviver, the eye-opener, the fog-cutter or the gloom-lifter, the Fizz came in a many different forms, with just about as many good stories to go with them:

“Back in the late 1800s ‘Professor’ Denton of Brooklyn, NY – “the champion gin fizz drinker in America” as he used to bill himself – was know to put away well up to 40 of the things in a days drinking if you’d believe it. That was until the poor fellow died of an internal haemorrhage after betting he could drink a Fizz and eat the glass too. Hmm. Not exactly an example to be emulated it would seem.”

And of the Ramos Gin Fizz…

“In 1887 a bartender by the name of Henry Charles Ramos (Carl to just about everyone) opened a bar in New Orleans and soon people were clamoring for his house special Fizzes. His recipe was unusual in that the ingredients needed A LOT of shaking to get them to emulsify. Carls solution? For each of his bartenders he would employ a “shaker boy” – a young man whose sole job it was to shake the bejeezus out of those fizzes. A few years on, the process had developd into a full production line… one man shook until his arms got tired and passed it to another, in a long chain. Some say this went on for 15 minutes. It sure was a sight to behold.” – from Imbibe! by David Wondrich

Measures & Instructions:

  • 5ml sugar syrup
  • 1 drop orange blossom water or rose water (optional)
  • juice of 1/2 lemon & 1/2 lime (use all lemon if you’re short on limes)
  • 1 1/2oz old tom gin (a sweet gin is preferable)
  • one egg white
  • 15ml cream or rich milk
  • 30ml sparkling water

Place all ingredients (MINUS the sparkling water!) with 1/2 cup crushed ice into a shaker.
“Shake & shake & shake until there is not a bubble left but the drink is smooth and snowy white and the consistency of good rich milk” – from the mouth of Mr Ramos himself
This will take at least one minute.
Strain into a chilled glass & top with the sparkling water.

Negroni

negroni

“The [campari] bitters are excellent for your liver, the gin is bad for you. They balance each other.” – Orson Welles 1947

Not a huge fan of campari but this is a classic if you do. For a longer, lighter drink based on the same ingredients try an Americano.

Measures & Instructions:

  • 1oz gin
  • 1oz sweet vermouth
  • 1oz campari

Shake ingredients together with ice, and strain into an iced old-fashioned glass (short straight-sided).
Twist a piece of orange peel over the drink then throw it in for good measure.

Bloodhound

2009_12_02_bloodhound

A fridge full of strawberries beg to be split between a plate of strawberries & cream and a couple of strawberry base drinks. A (very) quick search uncovered two. The Bloodhound – at its most fashionable in London in the 1920s, and is regarded as an acquired taste by many – is rather tasty. A lesser-known variation with raspberries instead of strawberries is called a Halsdon, but we shall try that in autumn.

Measures & Instructions:

  • 1.5oz Gin
  • 0.75oz dry Vermouth
  • 0.75oz sweet Vermouth
  • strawberry coulis/crushed strawberries

Shake ingredients in an ice filled cocktail shaker and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

This recipe is an adaptation from The Savoy Cocktail Book (which has you shake alcoholic ingredients and serve over crushed ice with strawberry coulis and strawberries garnish)

London Calling

It’s grey and a the air has a little nip in it. So very London, but spring in Auckland. With that in mind (and with what was in the liquor cabinet) we decided on a London theme to take the edge off.

Started down the gin route, settling on a London Fog (not the coat – it’s not that cold) – a simple mix of Gin, Pernod and frappe-style ice. Possibly should be served in an old-school small red wine glass to give it that real air of authenticity.

Second up was a drink mixed up by Joe Gilmore for Sir Winston Churchill on one of his many visits to The Savoy, aptly named The Churchill.

London Fog

2009_12_02_the_london_fog

It’s grey and a the air has a little nip in it. So very London, but spring in Auckland. With that in mind (and with what was in the liquor cabinet) we decided on a London theme to take the edge off.

Started down the gin route, settling on a London Fog (not the coat – it’s not that cold) – a simple mix of Gin, Pernod and frappe-style ice. Possibly should be served in an old-school small red wine glass to give it that real air of authenticity.

Second up was a drink mixed up by Joe Gilmore for Sir Winston Churchill on one of his many visits to The Savoy, aptly named The Churchill.

Measures & Instructions:

  • 1.75 oz Gin
  • 0.5 oz Pernod

Mix Gin and Pernod together in mixing glass and pour in chilled martini or champagne coupe filled with crushed/shaved ice



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